Saturday 25 March 2017
/ 6:30 pm
Short films about work from the Cineteca di Bologna archives
, 49’
While art has no precise starting date, the birth of cinema can be pinpointed as La Sortie de l’usine by the Lumière brothers, screened for the first time in Paris on 28 December 1895. The work opened the way to a rich production of short films that put the spotlight on ordinary people, fishermen, workers, firefighters, washerwomen, depicting the toil and dignity of their labours.

Screening presented by Gianluca Farinelli, director of the Cineteca di Bologna.

La Sortie de l’usine Lumière (Workers Leaving the Lumière Factory), by Louis Lumière, 1895, 2’30’’

France at Work
A selection of the first short films shot by the Lumière brothers. A journey through late 19th-century France depicted by short films of 50 seconds each.

Ateliers de La Ciotat (Factory at La Ciotat), by Louis Lumière, France, 1899
Chaudière (Boiler), Louis Lumière, France, 1896
Ouvriers réparant un trottoir en bitume (Workers Repairing an Asphalt Pavement), France, 1897
Défournage du Coke (Drawing Out the Coke), France, 1896
Laveuses sur la rivière (Washerwomen on the River), France, 1896
Transport d’une tourelle par un attelage de 60 chevaux (Transport of a Turret by a Team of Sixty Horses), France, 1896
Pêche aux sardines (Sardine Fishing), by Louis Lumière, France, 1896
Les pompiers, I: passage des pompes (Firemen at Lyon: A Fire Run), France, 1896
Attelage d’un camion (The Stonecarver's Team: Hitched to a Truck), France, 1896

The Harvest, Great Britain, 1908, 6’
Exploitation du sel en Sicile (Salt Exploitation in Sicily), Italy/France, 1912, 5’
Industrie des marbres à Carrare (The Marble Industries in Carrara), France, 1914, 6’
L’industria dell’argilla in Sicilia (The Clay Industry in Sicily), by Piero Marelli, Italy, 1910s, 5’
L'industria dei cappelli di paglia (The Hat Industry in Florence),
Italy, 1911, 6’
Fiat et son activité multiforme (Fiat and Its Manifold Activities), 1920s, 11’

/ 8:30 PM
THE CAMERAMAN

DIRECTED BY BUSTER KEATON AND EDWARD SEDGWICK, 1928, 75’
A bumbling cameraman can’t seem to get anything right: he could film important events if only he could remember to load the film in his camera and avoid superimposing one film over another... He’s about to give up his work when a little monkey, who has unwittingly filmed two interesting scenes, brings him success and the love of a beautiful girl.

SUNDAY 2 APRIL 2017
/ 6:30 PM

LADRI DI BICICLETTE (BICYCLE THIEVES)
DIRECTED BY VITTORIO DE SICA, 1948, 92’
After two years of unemployment, Antonio finds work posting advertising bills thanks to the bicycle he owns. On his first day of work, his bicycle is stolen; together with his ten-year-old son, Antonio wanders the city in search of the thief. Thus begins a long pilgrimage through Rome, a metaphor for the postwar society in which poverty intermingles with the desire to preserve one’s dignity. The film, a masterpiece of Neorealism by Vittorio De Sica and Cesare Zavattini, was honoured with numerous international awards, including the 1949 Nastro d'Argento for Best Director, Best Screenplay, Best Story, Best Cinematography, and Best Score, and the BAFTA Film Award, Oscar, and Golden Globe Award for Best Foreign Film in 1950.

/ 8.30 PM
IL POSTO
DIRECTED BY ERMANNO OLMI
, 1961, 98’
Il Posto is one of the most emblematic films of the Italian economic miracle. Its director observes the progress of industry from an eccentric viewpoint, allowing him to gather its less evident, but perhaps – partly for this reason – more decisive aspects: this perspective is the disorientated gaze, caught between hope and bitterness, of a young man leaving the foggy suburbs in search of a new role in the metropolis and industry of Milan. His story is a reflection of Italy as it changes, not only in its landscape but above all in its consciousness.

/ 10.15 PM
TRE FILI FINO A MILANO (THREE LINES TO MILAN)

DIRECTED BY ERMANNO OLMI, 1958, 25’
The documentary follows a team of workers busy installing a 220,000-volt electric line in Val Daone for the Milanese company Edisonvolta. The electrical pylons, rising over the rugged mountains and impassable valleys of Trentino, bring precious energy to the big city so as to power the endeavours of Lombardy’s the main manufacturers during the years of the economic boom. However, what rises to the fore is the director’s attention towards the human aspect, towards the workers’ faces marked by fatigue, in a worksite high in the mountains in early winter, towards gestures great and small, and towards their willpower, capable of overcoming any obstacle.

SUNDAY 9 APRIL 2017
/ 6 PM
I, DANIEL BLAKE

DIRECTED BY KEN LOACH, 2016, 100’
In his latest work, winner of the 2016 Palme d'Or at Cannes, Ken Loach returns to his beloved themes of work, dignity, and violated rights. The everyday struggle for survival is seen through the eyes of Daniel, a carpenter with a heart condition who, forced to leave his work after a heart attack, fights for his unemployment payments, and Katie, a poverty-stricken single mother who leaves London to move into a dilapidated council home in Newcastle. Daniel and Katie meet, two castaways in the ocean of bureaucracy, and they attempt to join forces.

/ 8:30 PM
TONI ERDMANN

DIRECTED BY MAREN ADE, 2017, 162’
Inès is a professional working in a large German corporation in Bucharest. Her life seems to go smoothly until her father arrives unexpectedly and asks her: “Are you happy?” Her inability to answer marks the beginning of a deep unease. Her intrusive father, always one to play pranks, will do anything to help her find herself again, dreaming up an amusing, eccentric character for himself: Toni Erdmann. The work was awarded the 2016 Lux Prize and nominated for Best Foreign Film at the 2017 Oscars.